scinerds:

Earth May Be in Early Days of 6th Mass Extinction

Earth may be in the early stages of a sixth mass extinction, an international team of scientists says.

Image: Neil deGrasse Tyson walks over to ‘The Halls of Extinction’ - Cosmos: A Space time Odyssey

Animals and plants are threatened. More than 320 land vertebrates have gone extinct since 1500, the researchers said. The world’s remaining animals with backbones are 25 percent less abundant than in 1500— a trend also seen in invertebrate animals, such as crustaceans, worms and butterflies, the scientists reported.

The previous mass extinction, which wiped out the dinosaurs, happened about 65 million years ago, likely from a catastrophic asteroid that collided with Earth. In contrast, the looming sixth mass extinction is linked to human activity, Rodolfo Dirzo, a professor of biology at Stanford University in California, said in a statement. Dirzo is the lead author of the new review of past research on the topic, which suggests Earth is in the early days of this sixth mass extinction.

A past study, which involved data from the fossil record and modern-day conservation biology, suggested Earth could enter such a mass extinction within the next 300 to 2,000 years. That study was detailed in the March 2, 2011, issue of the journal Nature.

Up to one-third of all vertebrates are threatened or endangered, the researchers said. Large animals — such as elephants, rhinoceroses and polar bears — have the highest rates of decline, which is a trend shared by other mass extinctions. These large animals are at particular risk because they tend to have few offspring and low population growth rates. Hunters and poachers, however, find their fur, meat, tusks or horns attractive targets.

Losing a species of large animal can have unexpected effects on the ecosystem and nearby human developments, a process known as defaunation. In one study, researchers isolated patches of land from animals, including zebra, giraffes and elephants. Without the animals, the grass and shrubs grew tall, and the soil became looser. Rodents quickly took over and doubled in numbers, eating the seeds from the plants and living in the patchy soil that was relatively predator-free.

Rodents can carry diseases and parasites that infect people, the researchers said.

"Where human density is high, you get high rates of defaunation, high incidence of rodents and thus high levels of pathogens, which increases the risks of disease transmission," Dirzo said. "Who would have thought that just defaunation would have all these dramatic consequences? But it can be a vicious circle."

The decline of big animals affects not only vegetation, but also invertebrates. In the past 50 years, the human population has doubled, and the number of invertebrate animals has dropped by 45 percent, the researchers said. Much of the loss is a result of habitat destruction and global climate disruption, the researchers said.

People need to understand the basics of evolution if they are going to reject it—otherwise, they are not contributing anything productive to modern society.” 

― Greg Graffin, Anarchy Evolution

People need to understand the basics of evolution if they are going to reject it—otherwise, they are not contributing anything productive to modern society.” 

― Greg Graffin, Anarchy Evolution

thescienceofreality:

project-argus:

Carl Sagan on astrology in newspapers.  From his interview with Ted Turner.
Also, photosets are fun.

I will never stop reblogging this set.
thescienceofreality:

project-argus:

Carl Sagan on astrology in newspapers.  From his interview with Ted Turner.
Also, photosets are fun.

I will never stop reblogging this set.
thescienceofreality:

project-argus:

Carl Sagan on astrology in newspapers.  From his interview with Ted Turner.
Also, photosets are fun.

I will never stop reblogging this set.
thescienceofreality:

project-argus:

Carl Sagan on astrology in newspapers.  From his interview with Ted Turner.
Also, photosets are fun.

I will never stop reblogging this set.

thescienceofreality:

project-argus:

Carl Sagan on astrology in newspapers.  From his interview with Ted Turner.

Also, photosets are fun.

I will never stop reblogging this set.

sixpenceee:

Infrared sound is a sound that we can’t hear but our ears can detect. Between 7Hz and 19Hz it can install the sense of being watched, dread, fear and panic. At 19Hz the sounds can vibrate with your eyeball, messing with your visions and causing you to think you can see figures in your peripheral vision.

Old houses and buildings have thick walls and messed up pipes which can emit infrared sounds. This is how haunted houses can come to be. 

The problem is not everyone is sensitive to this type of sound. Do you want to figure out if you are sensitive to this “ghostly noise”?

Well you can, because when tigers roar they emit infrared sound. Go on this website and scroll to the paragraph on roars and click on the speaker icon. 

http://www.acoustics.org/press/145th/Walsh2.htm

If you feel scared then you’re probably sensitive to it. 

"Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passions, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence."
John Adams, 2nd U.S. president (via whats-out-there)

Submitted by macgiddy. Thank you!

think-progress:

How the U.S.’s ZERO weeks of paid family leave compares to the rest of the world.
think-progress:

How the U.S.’s ZERO weeks of paid family leave compares to the rest of the world.

think-progress:

How the U.S.’s ZERO weeks of paid family leave compares to the rest of the world.

"I’d rather be a rising ape than a falling angel."
Terry Pratchett